Mosquito season is here – How to keep them away!

 

Mosquito season is here and there are several things YOU can do to help control these pesky and dangerous bugs while camping (or at home).

  1. If you have a boat, chances are it collects water…just where mosquitoes breed. Flip the boat and leave it in a position it will not collect water.
  2. If you have a bird bath or pet bowls on your lot, please dump them every time you leave and turn them upside down to prevent collection of water.
  3. If you have any other product or receptacle on your lot that might collect water, please get rid of it or turn it over.
  4. Burn Sage or Rosemary in your outdoor fires, those little buggers hate it and will stay away!
    Sage
    Sage
    Rosemary
    Rosemary
  5. If you are at home, plant fever few, citronella, catnip and lavender, they are four of the most effective plants for keeping away mosquitoes. Bring some with you when you camp!
    Feverfew
    Fever few
    Catnip
    Catnip

 

It’s not just the bite but what mosquitoes carry that is the danger. Several varieties of Encephalitis are carried by mosquitoes. Older diseases have been Malaria, Dengue, Yellow Fever and a variety of encephalitis including West Nile (WN), Eastern Equine (EEE), Western Equine (WEE), Saint Louis (SLE), and LaCrosse (LAC) viruses. More recently in the news is the new Zika virus which causes micro-encephalitis in new-born babies. For pet lovers there is Dog Heart worm which infects all breeds of dogs and cats.

So be alert to standing water in flower pots, old tires, boats and bird baths. Dump them out. And if you see standing water in your yard or your campsite, take actions to drain it or fill it. We don’t want anyone catching any of these diseases.

Oh, yes, did we mention Chikangunya? Yet another virus carried by the mosquito species Asian Tiger Mosquito (Aedes albopictus) and the Yellow Fever Mosquito (Aedes aegypti). Genetically, it appears that viral strain currently spreading throughout the Americas is more easily transmitted by Ae. aegypti. Both species lay their eggs in containers such as cans, discarded tires and other items that hold water close to human habitation, but Ae. aegypti is more geographically confined to the southeastern United States. Traditional mosquito methods of truck-mounted and aerial sprays are ineffective in controlling these mosquitoes. Removal of water-bearing containers and sanitation are key preventive strategies. The name “Chikungunya” is attributed to the Kimakonde (a Mozambique dialect) word meaning “that which bends up”, which describes the primary symptom – excruciating joint pain. Although rarely fatal, the symptoms are debilitating and may persist for several weeks. There is no vaccine and primary treatment is limited to pain medication.

 

We hope you find this information useful!